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Read about the important science being undertaken at NIWA, and how it affects New Zealanders. 

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A chance discovery off the Gisborne coast five years ago is prompting a NIWA scientist to find out more about the link between a field of methane seeps bubbling out of the sea floor and submarine landslides.
On the eve of the 30th anniversary since the Montreal Protocol came into force, new research by NIWA scientists reinforces its reputation as the world’s most successful environmental treaty.
An interest in spoilers on sportscars has paid off for a Year 8 Seatoun student who won the $1000 NIWA prize for best exhibit in this year’s NIWA Wellington Science and Technology Fair.
Everything from eating brownies made with bugs to a substitute for stickers on fruit has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Auckland Science and Technology Fair.
Everything from traffic safety to chickens and ballet shoes has had a scientific eye cast over it ahead of this year’s NIWA Wellington Science and Technology Fair.
NIWA meteorologists are keeping an eye on an unusual atmospheric phenomenon that is amassing in the polar stratosphere.
Frustration with buying fruit and vegetables that are never ready to eat prompted a 13-year-old Tauranga girl to a design a machine to help.
A 12-year-old has taken on the most damaging honey bee parasite in the world to win the NIWA Waikato Science and Technology Fair.
Two reports released today by NIWA and the Deep South National Science Challenge reveal new information about how many New Zealanders, how many buildings and how much infrastructure could be affected by extreme river and coastal flooding from storms and sea-level rise.
A worm that feeds on bacteria and has no eyes is one of the standout stars of almost 600 unfamiliar and potentially new ocean species identified at NIWA in the past year.
Weather forecasters will not be affected by Vodafone’s 5G network initial roll-out in New Zealand.
EQC, GNS Science and NIWA have joined forces to further develop world-leading natural hazards risk modelling for New Zealand.
Under the light of the moon where the river meets the sea, NIWA researchers are planning to catch tiny fish that are all but invisible to the naked eye.
The first month of data from NIWA’s air quality monitoring project in Arrowtown reveals that air quality has already breached the national standard eight times this winter, including six times in the week from 19 to 26 June – in fact every time the air temperature dropped below freezing.
We’re now halfway through 2019 and NIWA climate data from the first six months tell a dramatic story of weather and climate extremes.
We’re here already – the shortest day is tomorrow (Saturday) and after this, it gets progressively lighter out to the longest day of the year in December.
Understanding how the Antarctic oceans work is vital to predicting the world’s future climate and the implications of climate change for humankind and the planet.
New Zealanders are fast becoming aware that our changing climate matters a great deal. NIWA Chief Executive John Morgan explains.
While most New Zealanders were settling into their summer break, some scientists were double-checking their survival gear before heading to work deep in the Southern Ocean.

The on-going rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) that is fuelling climate change is also driving significant changes in the waters off our coasts.

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