News

Read about the important science being undertaken at NIWA, and how it affects New Zealanders. 

Subscribe by RSS

Ruth Beran discovers that public interest in the state of fresh waterways has driven a dramatic change in the tools used by scientists.
NIWA scientists like Leigh Tait were saddened by the human impact of the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake, but he also says that it provided a “massive natural history experiment”.
The first Wednesday of the month finds Philippa Eberlein and her Friends of the Maitai colleagues collecting samples from the Maitai River in Nelson.
How a regional climate history helped save a farm and cure depression
New Zealand’s glaciers have all retreated and lost volume since NIWA started surveying them in 1977.
Sun worshippers may feel the burn next week as scientists and health professionals from around the world meet in Wellington to discuss the latest research on the effects of UV radiation.
NIWA has joined forces with Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology to issue a joint Special Climate Statement about unusual weather patterns over summer.
Scientists have launched a worldwide crowdsourcing competition aimed at finding novel ideas to tackle invasive marine pests, with a cash prize of $US10,000 on offer.

The absence of sea ice near Antarctica over the past six weeks has astonished scientists undertaking research aboard NIWA’s flagship research vessel Tangaroa.

Tangaroa Marine Environment and Ecosystem Voyage 2018

The 2016 Kaikōura Earthquake has shown that more than 100 million dumptrucks of mud and sand flow through the Kaikōura Canyon every 140 years, scientists say.
Climate scientists and glaciologists are taking to the skies this week to find out how New Zealand’s glaciers are faring following this summer’s record-breaking warmth.
When NIWA fisheries scientist Richard O’Driscoll went to sea earlier this year, he and his team measured so many fish that laid end to end, they would have stretched for 31km.
Ancient swamp kauri is being used by NIWA scientists to reveal the secrets of past climates.
Despite a sub-tropical storm and two ex-tropical cyclones, this summer is about to become the hottest in history.
At a laboratory just outside Whangarei, scientists are putting very young snapper through comprehensive physical testing - including a full medical check-up involving smell, hearing, vision, and even anxiety testing.
A two-week expedition to tag blue whales in New Zealand waters for the first time, almost came up empty due to warmer sea temperatures causing the animals to change their behaviour.
Hotspots in the North Island are located across Gisborne, the Tararua District, and in parts of west coastal Taranaki. The only hotspot in the South Island is in Southland.
North Island hotspots continue to be found across much of Gisborne, northern Hawke’s Bay, and Tararua west to Horowhenua and Kapiti Coast. A small hotspot has also emerged across the east coast of the Coromandel Peninsula. The only hotspot in the South Island continues to be located in Southland, but it has decreased significantly in size and strength due to the recent heavy rainfall.
Forty intrepid adventurers leave Wellington next week for a six-week scientific voyage to Antarctica.
Current North Island hotspots are found in coastal Gisborne, interior Wairoa, as well as small portions of Kapiti Coast, Horowhenua, and Tararua. The only hotspot in the South Island continues to be a sizeable one which covers much of southern and interior Otago and nearly all of Southland.

Pages

Subscribe to NIWA news feed