Fisheries news

News and media releases related to the our fisheries-related work.

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A chance find by a woman walking on a Northland beach is now helping scientists learn more about mako sharks.
Warrick Lyon is heading to the Marshall Islands to teach fisheries observers how to tag sharks.
When NIWA fisheries scientist Richard O’Driscoll went to sea earlier this year, he and his team measured so many fish that laid end to end, they would have stretched for 31km.
At a laboratory just outside Whangarei, scientists are putting very young snapper through comprehensive physical testing - including a full medical check-up involving smell, hearing, vision, and even anxiety testing.
“You almost become a fishing psychologist – you can tell by the way people walk up the ramp to get their trailer if they’ve had a good day.”
The spread of Bonamia ostreae from Marlborough Sounds to oyster farms in Big Glory Bay (Stewart Island) could spread to the valuable wild oyster population.
NIWA is today issuing some scientific information on the parasite Bonamia ostreae, recently discovered in Big Glory Bay, Stewart Island, and the risk it poses to the Bluff oyster fishery.

Scientists from around the globe are meeting in Nelson next week to discuss the latest advances in fisheries technology.

Boaties in Tasman and Golden Bays are likely to notice a larger than usual vessel working close to shore over the next few days.

For the first time, the use of management science in fisheries has been captured in a book.
NIWA scientists are asking for help from people who have had a long association with East Northland, Hauraki Gulf or Marlborough Sounds.
The Quota Management System, which some say saved New Zealand fisheries, is 30 years old today. The system is founded on science that studies fish biology, abundance and distribution, and estimates how many can be caught and still keep the population healthy.
At the edge of the advancing winter sea ice in the Ross Sea, a first-ever winter fisheries survey has uncovered new secrets of the Antarctic toothfish.
Marine scientists are proving they know that it takes good bait to catch a big audience.
NIWA-developed software is becoming the international standard in the assessment and management of fish stocks.
Te Papa has released a publication containing information, including pictures, distribution maps for all 1,262 known fish species found in our waters.
Recreational fishers in the Marlborough Sounds, Tasman and Golden Bays are being approached at boat ramps in the region in the hope they will provide information on their catches for a research survey.
The increasing threat of marine pests to New Zealand’s biosecurity is the focus of a major new research project to be conducted by NIWA scientists.
New Zealand’s leading freshwater and estuarine research body is harnessing the national curiosity about ecology to find out more about grey mullet.
Each March, oyster lovers descend on the catch of Bluff’s best bivalves – a seasonal delicacy from one of the last remaining wild oyster fisheries on the planet.

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