Energy

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Better data, better business, better environment

Cold temperature specs for fuel products

Giving biogas a good scrub

New book to help primary industries

Hydro lake storage: early signs of concern

Monitoring toxic hydrocarbons in Auckland's air

Bury it down a deep hole

Improving air quality monitoring

A surprising source of methane

Hydro lakes: situation improves

Climate-energy workshop attracts attention

Nitrous oxide in the paddock

Smart rainfall model varies season length

Major advance for clean energy research

Hydro lakes likely to stay low

Preparing for renewable marine energy

Wellington vehicles put to the test

How will future climate affect hydro storage?

Brisbane vehicle emissions tested

How's the air?

Wave energy device under development

CRL Energy joins national centre

Wave energy device under development

Towards energy-efficient buildings

Energy Scenarios to 2050

Investigating Future Energy: Hydrogen

Managing New Zealand's Energy Under Stormy Skies

Pure hydrogen stream on track

Carbon storage presentation wins award

New Zealand's bioenergy research

Biofuel testing at CRL Energy

Bioenergy: where to now?

Secure, clean, internationally competitive energy solutions will be the focus of CRL Energy under a new ownership deal signed last week.

A single tidal turbine 10 metres in diameter in the Cook Strait’s Tory Channel could generate enough electricity to power 12 homes, says NIWA scientist Derek Goring.

The effect of New Zealand’s climate on energy supply and demand will be examined in a new six-year programme worth more than $1 million. The research was announced in the budget last week and will be carried out by NIWA and funded by the Foundation for Research, Science & Technology.

New Zealand farmers can get energy from animal waste and reduce greenhouse gas emissions at the same time.

Keeping your car in tune could do more to help reduce motor vehicle pollution than fitting catalytic converters, says the National Centre for Climate–Energy Solutions.

The announcement last week that the Maui gas field might run out 2 years early is a worry because New Zealand relies on natural gas for much of its energy needs. There are also emission problems associated with burning fossil fuels, and fossil fuels are not renewable. So, where can we get the energy we need if we want to increase our economic prosperity and improve our standard of living, without damaging the environment?

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