Lakes

Latest news

NIWA discusses, in depth, this year's most asked question—what is happening to our fresh waterways?
NIWA researchers have spent part of the last month keeping a close eye on the bottom of Lake Tekapo to find out what it looks like and what is going on below the lake bed.
A NIWA study has shown that environmental factors influence the level of mercury in fish and other organisms in lakes in New Zealand's North Island geothermal area

John Clayton, a principal scientist in the fields of aquatic biodiversity and biosecurity based at NIWA's Hamilton office, has won a 2011 Kudos award for his leading role in the development of LakeSPI  (Lake Submerged Plant Indicators). 

Our work

This research project aimed to understand the causes behind differences in mercury in trout and other organisms in the Bay of Plenty/Te Arawa lakes—in particular what features of each lake explain why mercury in trout is higher in some lakes than in other lakes.

NIWA recently hosted visitors from Northland to view cultivated plants from Lake Ōmāpere that are now ‘extinct in the wild’, and discussed plans for their reintroduction to the lake in the future. 

The ability to properly manage our freshwater resources requires a solid understanding of the flora and fauna which live in and interact with them.
This project aims to increase our knowledge of aquatic ecosystems and their restoration, and apply this to degraded streams, rivers, lakes and estuaries.
The ability to properly manage our freshwater resources requires a solid understanding of the flora and fauna which live in and interact with them.

Welcome to Freshwater Update for May 2012.

This issue contains news about work from NIWA's Freshwater team, and Water Quality maps and information for the period January, February, March 2012.

As well as the articles below, the following have been added to our website:

Robot spies make new science discoveries in Fiordland's World Heritage Park

Welcome to Freshwater Update.

Here we bring you a review and outlook of New Zealand's freshwater resources, seasonal water quality information and news of our latest freshwater research. 

As well as the articles in this update, the following have been posted to our website:

Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems 

John Clayton, a principal scientist in the fields of aquatic biodiversity and biosecurity based at NIWA's Hamilton office, has won a 2011 Kudos award for his leading role in the development of LakeSPI  (Lake Submerged Plant Indicators). 

Pages

 

All staff working on this subject

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Freshwater Fisheries Ecologist
Principal Scientist - Aquatic Pollution
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Freshwater Fish Ecologist
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Environmental Scientist
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