Instrumentation

A buoy with the ability to “phone home” has been deployed in Wellington Harbour today to monitor currents, waves and water quality in the harbour.
Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

NIWA researchers have spent part of the last month keeping a close eye on the bottom of Lake Tekapo to find out what it looks like and what is going on below the lake bed.
In this issue: NIWA has designed, supplied and installed a complex web-enabled automatic control system, comprised of nearly 60 control stations, and software to manage the water distribution across Ragitata South Irrigation (RSI); Technologists, researchers, farmers, regulators and irrigation scheme operators are jointly evolving a water use strategy for Canterbury; Rain and irrigation water can transport fertilizer, farm chemicals, animal waste and pathogens to unknown destinations underground, in various proportions and concentrations.
NIWA’s Fieldays team is basking in the glory of winning the Best Indoor Agribusiness Site awarded by the National Agricultural Fieldays organisation for the 2015 event.
NIWA IrriMet

NIWA has developed new tools that can help farmers decide when to irrigate or fertilise. But it needs farmers to test out the tools to ensure they are as practical and easy to use as possible.

The first new tool is called NIWA IrriMet and will be demonstrated at the NIWA stand in the main pavilion at this year’s National Agricultural Fieldays. IrriMet follows the successful launch of FarmMet at last year’s Fieldays.

FarmMet is a tailored weather forecasting tool that provides accurate up-to-date forecasts specific to individual properties. It works by capturing data from climate stations closest to an individual farm and using that to tailor a forecast to farmers delivered straight to their computer.

IrriMet also taps into this same data which is fed in real time to NIWA’s supercomputer, combined with high-resolution weather forecasting and soil information to generate a six-day forecast of soil moisture and leaching potential.

It tells farmers when and how much to irrigate, what the leaching potential is and how overall growth is tracking.

Further information

Read more on NIWA.co.nz

Visit the Irrimet website

Climate Present and Past is a core-funded project under NIWA's National Climate Centre. It aims to explore historical climate data and track past changes in climate through a range of approaches.
A World Meteorological Organisation panel has confirmed a finding that a temperature of -25.6°C observed at Eweburn, Ranfurly in New Zealand on 17 July 1903 is the coldest temperature recorded for the Southwest Pacific Region.
In this issue: solving a unique water abstraction and consent monitoring challenge at Lake Alta; tailoring weather and soil moisture data to aid irrigation management by north-Canterbury farmers; incorporating a NIWA snow and ice monitoring station into a global experiment; using wireless technology to collect multiple environmental data from scattered monitoring sites.

The Hydrological Society & The Meteorological Society of NZ joint conference

19 November 2013 to 22 November 2013

NIWA is sponsoring The Hydrological Society & The Meteorological Society of NZ joint conference

The theme of this year’s conference is Water and Weather: Solutions for health, wealth and environment.

The conference is being held in Palmerston North, and will attract scientists, technicians, consultants, hydrologists, climatologists, students, resource managers and many others. 

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