Fish

Havelock Mussel Festival

20 March 2010

Year after year the Havelock Mussel Festival is a huge success, drawing crowds of up to 6000 people.
In 2009 there were a record number of 70 stalls which offered food, wine and beer, crafts and industry displays. This was in conjunction with top kiwi entertainment, lots of fun activities - it really is the festival that brings the whole community together.
In 2010 NIWA will again be taking a Gold Sponsorship of the event, sponsoring the The NIWA Kidzone.

New Zealand’s iconic whitebait species are disappearing from our waterways, but help could soon be at hand for the threatened giant kōkopu.

The giant kōkopu is a native whitebait species considered rare and vulnerable. NIWA is working with Mahurangi Technical Institute and environmental consultancy Boffa Miskell to test the feasibility of reintroducing giant kōkopu to Nukumea Stream, north of Auckland.

Researchers at the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) have contributed their findings to a major news release by the Census of Marine Life charting an astonishing abundance, diversity, and distribution of deep-sea species.

Scientists from the UK, Japan and New Zealand have successfully photographed the deepest fish in the southern hemisphere at 7561 metres deep in the Kermadec Trench, just northeast of New Zealand.

Welcome to the first e-newsletter from NIWA's National Centre for Aquaculture & Biotechnology. Here, we'll bring you news of aquaculture and biotechnology research at NIWA, and forthcoming events and workshops.

Using its broad base of capability, NIWA is creating a new aquaculture species for New Zealand - hāpuku - for sale in the world's fine dining sector.

Welcome to the newsletter for NIWA's National Centre for Aquaculture & Biotechnology. Here we'll bring you news of research discoveries, new initiatives, courses, and events in these exciting and commercially-orientated fields.

These guides are designed for rapid identification of freshwater flora and fauna for use in biomonitoring.

Inshore and onshore biodiversity sampling activity is about to commence in the Bay of Islands as the Bay of Islands Ocean Survey 20/20 project enters its next phase.

West Coast tarakihi may start their life in Tasman and Golden Bays. Scientists on-board NIWA’s coastal research vessel Kaharoa are trying to find out for sure.

The kōaro was once abundant in the Te Arawa lakes near Rotorua in New Zealand’s North Island. NIWA has assessed the viability of restoring this species in the region.

NIWA is supporting the advancement of the New Zealand aquaculture sector through the development of high value products of verifiable quality and sustainability.

In a collaborative study, echosounder surveys of the lower reservoir at ZEALANDIA, the Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, show that electro-fishing and netting have successfully reduced perch numbers in the conservation safe haven.

The New Zealand Freshwater Fish Database (NZFFD) records the occurrence of fish in fresh waters of New Zealand.

Journal papers

Clark, M.R, Dunn, M.R., McMillan, P.J., Pinkerton, M.H., Stewart, A., Hanchet, S.M. (2010). Latitudinal variation of demersal fish assemblages in the western Ross Sea. Antarctic Science 22: 782–792.

Dunn, A., Hanchet, S.M. (2010). Assessment models for Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni) in the Ross Sea including data from the 2006–07 season. New Zealand Fisheries Assessment Report 2010/1. 28 p.

There are two main species of toothfish in the Southern Ocean.

  • Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides). The Patagonian toothfish lives in predominantly subantarctic waters and is the target for important fisheries (2,000–5,000 tonnes per year) around South Georgia (Subarea 48.3), Kerguelen Islands (Division 58.5.1) and Heard and McDonald Islands (Division 58.5.2). It is uncommon south of 65°S in the Ross Sea region.

What risk from alien fish?

Koi carp – a high-risk alien species. (Photo: NIWA)

The risk posed by alien fish to our freshwater species and habitats can now be evaluated using a model developed by NIWA scientists. The Freshwater Fish Risk Assessment Model (FRAM) assesses the risk of new alien fish species becoming established in New Zealand, and, importantly, their capacity to damage the environment, giving an overall ‘ecological risk’.
FRAM is powerful and simple to use.

Epic Antarctic voyage complete: analysis begins

Applying the science: didymo

Major port biosecurity surveillance underway

What risk from alien fish?

NIWA is at the forefront of kingfish aquaculture research and is rapidly developing the commercial-scale production technology needed to capitalise on this potentially lucrative market.

Two fossils discovered in the Ormond Valley, near Gisborne, have been identified as a mysterious extinct native fish, the grayling or upokororo. They represent the first known fossils of New Zealand grayling.

Scientists from NIWA are diving in Waitemata Harbour to establish precisely how far an invasive sea squirt, known as the clubbed tunicate (or Styela clava), has spread.

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