Fish

Rapid warming of the ocean near Tasmania may provide a good indication of how the water around New Zealand will change as the planet warms, say NIWA scientists.

New science on inanga

The inward migrations of inanga (Galaxias maculatus) post-larvae back to freshwaters occur primarily in late winter and spring time where they are targeted as part of the whitebait fishery. In this study, we shed light on the relationships between growth attained in pelagic and freshwater environments.
The spread of Bonamia ostreae from Marlborough Sounds to oyster farms in Big Glory Bay (Stewart Island) could spread to the valuable wild oyster population.
The Ross Sea Marine Protected Area (MPA) in the Southern Ocean will help further research into the ecology of Antarctic toothfish.
Twelve bespoke concrete structures resembling "upside down oven trays" may hold the key to restoring the paua population off Kaikoura wiped out by last November's earthquake.
Local hapū and NIWA are working together to find out more about juvenile freshwater eels or tuna in streams connecting to the Wairua River in the Wairoa catchment in Northland.
NIWA is today issuing some scientific information on the parasite Bonamia ostreae, recently discovered in Big Glory Bay, Stewart Island, and the risk it poses to the Bluff oyster fishery.

As New Zealand's "Mr Eel", Niwa's Dr Don Jellyman has heard every tall tale. And some of them may be true.

The role of toothfish in the ecosystem.

Inputs into stock assessment

Scientists from around the globe are meeting in Nelson next week to discuss the latest advances in fisheries technology.

Boaties in Tasman and Golden Bays are likely to notice a larger than usual vessel working close to shore over the next few days.

The effects of climate change on fish are being studied in a world-first trial at NIWA’s Bream Bay marine science centre.
A voyage to the Kermadec Islands has resulted in the discovery of many species either new to science or not previously found in the area.
Exploring the deepsea

Despite many centuries of maritime exploration, only a fraction of our planet's seafloor has been observed. NIWA Deepsea Scientist Di Tracey tells us what it feels like to probe deep beneath the waves to see what's living on the ocean floor.

Māori communities around the country note that the abundance, size and/or distribution of tuna, kōura and kāeo/kākahi is declining and that current populations aren’t sufficient to meet their needs.

NIWA scientists are asking for help from people who have had a long association with East Northland, Hauraki Gulf or Marlborough Sounds.
NIWA is looking for people who have had a long association with the Hauraki Gulf or Marlborough Sounds to help them with a research project on juvenile fish habitats.
Over the last few days the “dive team” have been recording corals, fishes, urchins and other invertebrates from the shallow waters (0-30m) surrounding Raoul Island to complement the biodiversity records from the deeper ocean collected by the other scientists onboard.
Mesopelagic trawl from the RV Tangaroa October 2016 Kermadec Voyage

Using a very wide net to complete a 960m deep mesopelagic trawl near the Kermadec Islands has brought up a large number and diverse range of deep water species.

Scientists are especially interested in lanternfish and their nightly feeding movements from the ocean depths to the surface - a daily round-trip journey for these tiny fish.

This type of sampling has rarely been carried out at these depths. The distribution and range of marine species and their numbers recorded in the trawl
will provide a snapshot in time for researchers studying longer term changes in biodiversity across South Pacific waters.

The temperature through the water column has been measured from 19°C at the surface to only 5°C at 1000m depth. These recordings also help scientists build up a picture of the ecological impacts of climate change on marine life in the area over time.

The Quota Management System, which some say saved New Zealand fisheries, is 30 years old today. The system is founded on science that studies fish biology, abundance and distribution, and estimates how many can be caught and still keep the population healthy.
Te Papa has released a publication containing information, including pictures, distribution maps for all 1,262 known fish species found in our waters.
CASAL2 is an advanced software package developed by NIWA for modelling the population dynamics of marine species.
Identifying creepy crawlies in your local stream just got a whole lot easier and faster, thanks to a new 3D identification system developed by a NIWA researcher.
NIWA researchers have produced a series of calendars to inform people when New Zealand's native freshwater and sport fish are migrating and spawning.

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