Ecosystems

Latest news

Christchurch’s Red Zone is to be the focal point of a scientific experiment involving street lights and insects over summer. 
NIWA scientists have found signs of recovery in the Kaikōura Canyon seabed, 10 months after powerful submarine landslides triggered by the November earthquake wiped out organisms living in and on the seabed.

We examine how the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge plans to enhance the use of marine resources within biological constraints.

A NIWA scientist is calling for greater protection of submarine canyons around New Zealand as their rich marine life comes under increasing threat from human activity.

Our work

Our oceans are expected to become more acidic as carbon dioxide concentrations rise. This will likely have impacts on the plankton, which play a major role in ocean ecosystems and processes.
NIWA hosted an IPBES workshop entitled “Visions for nature and nature’s contributions to people for the 21st century” held from 4-8 September 2017 in Auckland.
NIWA is conducting a five–year study to map changes in the distribution of plankton species in surface waters between New Zealand and the Ross Sea.
New Zealand's Kaikoura Canyon is a 'biodiversity hotspot', containing far more life than seen before at such depths.

Latest videos

Taking the pulse of Antarctica’s ocean ecosystem
Niwa scientists have anchored an echosounder to the sea floor of Terra Nova Bay that could reveal the mystery of silverfish reproduction under the Antarctic ice.
Southern Blue Whiting Fishery

NIWA fisheries scientist Dr Stuart Hanchet describes the history and management of the southern blue whiting fishery, centred around New Zealand's subantarctic islands.

Kaikoura Canyon Seabed Life

The video represents a number of clips that have been spliced together to illustrate the abundant life associated with the muddy seabed sediments in Kaikoura Canyon at 1000m.

This project aims to increase our knowledge of aquatic ecosystems and their restoration, and apply this to degraded streams, rivers, lakes and estuaries.
Christchurch’s Red Zone is to be the focal point of a scientific experiment involving street lights and insects over summer. 
NIWA hosted an IPBES workshop entitled “Visions for nature and nature’s contributions to people for the 21st century” held from 4-8 September 2017 in Auckland.
Atlantis is a 3D, spatially-explicit, trophodynamic ecosystem model that integrates biology, physics, chemistry and human impacts to provide a synoptic view of marine ecosystem function.
Unlike other ecosystem models, machine learning is built solely from the information it is presented.
Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) is trophodynamic modelling software that uses a mass-balance approach to describe ecosystem based, marine food web interactions.
Spatially explicit disturbance/recovery models are a cellular automaton that uses a mechanistic approach to investigate recovery rates of benthic species following disturbance events.
Resource trade-off models are spatial models that use biological, environmental and socio-economic data to optimise management (protected area designation) across potentially conflicting uses, or across different ecosystem services.
MICE (Models of Intermediate Complexity) is a type of ecosystem model that is question-driven, and contains a limited number of components and ecological processes.

These models can look at the movement of carbon into the water, through the food chain, and then the export to the lower depths of the ocean.

At NIWA, we consider all components of the marine ecosystem important when trying to better understand the role of dynamic, ecosystem processes on the distribution and abundance of marine organisms in New Zealand’s marine environments.
NIWA scientists have found signs of recovery in the Kaikōura Canyon seabed, 10 months after powerful submarine landslides triggered by the November earthquake wiped out organisms living in and on the seabed.

We examine how the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge plans to enhance the use of marine resources within biological constraints.

A NIWA scientist is calling for greater protection of submarine canyons around New Zealand as their rich marine life comes under increasing threat from human activity.
A tiny community of New Zealand sea lions on the Otago Peninsula is helping scientists solve the mystery of why some populations are doing better than others.
A list of current voyage reports in downloadable formats.
Taking the pulse of Antarctica’s ocean ecosystem
Niwa scientists have anchored an echosounder to the sea floor of Terra Nova Bay that could reveal the mystery of silverfish reproduction under the Antarctic ice.
Now back on dry land, Voyage Leader Richard O'Driscoll reflects on the final days of RV Tangaroa's 2015 Antarctica expedition.
The first objective of the New Zealand- Australia Antarctic Ecosystems Voyage was successfully achieved with the completion of the research at the Balleny Islands.

Pages

 

All staff working on this subject

placeholder image
Hydro-ecological Modeller
Phone: +64-3-343-7848
placeholder image
Principal Scientist - Ecosystem Modelling
Phone: +64-7-856-1798
placeholder image
Fisheries Modeller
Phone: +64-4-386-0522
placeholder image
Fisheries Scientist
Phone: +64-4-382-1610
Freshwater Ecologist
Phone: +64-7-859-1882
Marine Mammal Acoustician
Phone: +64-4-386-0538
placeholder image
Riparian and Wetland Scientist
Phone: +64-7-838-8361
Marine Ecologist
Phone: +64-4-386-0516
placeholder image
Freshwater Ecologist
Phone: +64-3-343-8061
placeholder image
Marine Biologist
Phone: +64-3-545-7735
placeholder image
Freshwater Ecologist
Phone: +64-7-859-1812
Assistant Regional Manager - Christchurch
Phone: +64-3-343-8052
placeholder image
Water Quality Modeller
Phone: +64-3-343-8023
placeholder image
Principal Scientist - Marine Ecology
Phone: +64-7-859-1803
Principal Scientist - Fisheries
Phone: +64-4-386-0876
Subscribe to RSS - Ecosystems