Biosecurity

Latest news

Scientists have launched a worldwide crowdsourcing competition aimed at finding novel ideas to tackle invasive marine pests, with a cash prize of $US10,000 on offer.
Every year NIWA carries out numerous marine surveillance missions, surveys at ports and harbours around the country. Their divers are looking for the pests that have hitched a ride to New Zealand waters and are capable of destroying our unique ecosystems and shellfish industry.

When you are at the beach or harbours this summer, don't be surprised if you see sea squirts - marine animals we commonly see attached to rocks and wharf piles that have two siphons on the top of their bodies, one to draw in water and the other to expel it. When disturbed, sea squirts contract their siphons, expelling streams of water—hence their name.

NIWA has recently completed a national project for modelling the leaching of copper from antifouling paints on vessels' hulls.

Our work

A significant threat to the biosecurity of New Zealand's freshwater habitats comes from plants that have been intentionally introduced.

Our native marine life and ecosystems are vulnerable to non-native marine pests entering our coastal environments. These marine pests have been introduced to Aotearoa on boats arriving at our ports and harbours and can spread easily through ballast water and hull fouling.

Understanding how material released into the ocean spreads is very important in the case of oil spills, sediment transport and the release of invasive species. 

This unique project is the first systematic attempt to quantify and map environmental values of New Zealand's coastal marine ecosystem.

Freshwater Update 79 brings you the latest information from our Freshwater & Estuaries Centre, with articles ranging from NIWA working with NASA; restoring a stream catchment in Kaikōura; looking after urban water; keeping soil and reducing sedimentation; to culling catfish.

Scientists have launched a worldwide crowdsourcing competition aimed at finding novel ideas to tackle invasive marine pests, with a cash prize of $US10,000 on offer.
Every year NIWA carries out numerous marine surveillance missions, surveys at ports and harbours around the country. Their divers are looking for the pests that have hitched a ride to New Zealand waters and are capable of destroying our unique ecosystems and shellfish industry.

Our native marine life and ecosystems are vulnerable to non-native marine pests entering our coastal environments. These marine pests have been introduced to Aotearoa on boats arriving at our ports and harbours and can spread easily through ballast water and hull fouling.

Our native marine life and ecosystems are vulnerable to non-native marine pests entering our coastal environments. These marine pests have been introduced to Aotearoa on boats arriving at our ports and harbours and can spread easily through ballast water and hull fouling.

When you are at the beach or harbours this summer, don't be surprised if you see sea squirts - marine animals we commonly see attached to rocks and wharf piles that have two siphons on the top of their bodies, one to draw in water and the other to expel it. When disturbed, sea squirts contract their siphons, expelling streams of water—hence their name.

NIWA has recently completed a national project for modelling the leaching of copper from antifouling paints on vessels' hulls.

This programme will improve our ability to reduce the risk of freshwater invasive species entering and establishing in New Zealand.
A significant threat to the biosecurity of New Zealand's freshwater habitats comes from plants that have been intentionally introduced.
This is a series of fact sheets on alien fish, invertebrate, algal and weed species that are recorded in New Zealand freshwaters.

Understanding how material released into the ocean spreads is very important in the case of oil spills, sediment transport and the release of invasive species. 

Boaties, beware this summer of a weird hitch-hiker waving at you in the water, as a peculiar marine amphipod crustacean, Caprella mutica, may be freeloading on your boat hull.

Scientists at NIWA and Auckland University have discovered that the fouling of vessels by marine creatures is greatly increased by the underwater sounds generated by the vessels themselves.

International Congress for Conservation Biology

5 December 2011 to 9 December 2011

NIWA is sponsoring the 25th International Congress for Conservation Biology.

NIWA staff are running three workshop 'Think Tanks' before the conference, these worksops are:

Implications of environmental change to Antarctic ecosystems 2, 3, 4 December, for more information contact v.cummings@niwa.co.nz 

Deep-sea coral research to enhance conservation 2, 3 December, for more information contact d.tracey@niwa.co.nz

Exotic aquatic plants, introduced to New Zealand for the aquarium and ornamental pond trade, are silently invading our waterways, but new research by NIWA scientists is helping to lower this risk by finding native alternatives for the trade.
A new web portal offers a previously unseen record of the marine pests that threaten New Zealand's marine environment.

Welcome to NIWA's third Alumni Update – an e-newsletter for past NIWA employees.

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All staff working on this subject

Assistant Regional Manager - Christchurch
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Marine Invertebrate Systematist
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Scientist, Marine Biology
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Environmental Monitoring Technician
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Fisheries Scientist
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Marine Ecology Technician
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Environmental Scientist
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