Atmosphere

Latest news

The on-going rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) that is fuelling climate change is also driving significant changes in the waters off our coasts.
Dr Sara Mikaloff-Fletcher is looking to turn the internationally accepted science of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions upside down – and the rest of the world is watching closely.
Arrowtown may be known for its picturesque autumn scenery, but in winter this tiny Central Otago town has a problem.
Massive increases in computing power are allowing NIWA scientists to not only analyse more data, faster, but also to envisage completely new experiments.

Our work

This research project focusses on modelling atmospheric chemistry and climate from the surface to the top of the stratosphere, using sophisticated chemistry-climate models.

The current method for calculating wind speed-up is inadequate, and can grossly under-predict correct design wind speeds in NZ's complex terrain.

Latest videos

The laser lady of Lauder

By day Penny Smale is a mum to two young boys, living on a rural property in the middle of a farming district in Central Otago.
By night, she leaves home, walks the short distance to what is essentially a large outbuilding in a paddock, and fires lasers into the sky. Penny operates a Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) instrument at the Lauder research station in Central Otago.  Essentially, she fires lasers into the sky and uses a telescope to measure what comes back.

The on-going rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide (C02) that is fuelling climate change is also driving significant changes in the waters off our coasts.
Dr Sara Mikaloff-Fletcher is looking to turn the internationally accepted science of monitoring greenhouse gas emissions upside down – and the rest of the world is watching closely.
Arrowtown may be known for its picturesque autumn scenery, but in winter this tiny Central Otago town has a problem.

CarbonWatchNZ is an internationally-recognised research programme that will enable New Zealand to make the right decisions for a zero carbon future.

Massive increases in computing power are allowing NIWA scientists to not only analyse more data, faster, but also to envisage completely new experiments.

Today we found NIWA’s Andrew Marriner hard at work in the Ocean-Atmosphere Container Lab and asked him to explain his work onboard.

If it wasn't for a damaged shoulder, Wills Dobson wouldn't be launching weather balloons or fixing high-precision atmospheric measuring instruments.
Sitting at the surface of Taylor Glacier in Antarctica, are layers of ice more than 10,000 years old. And trapped inside those layers are bubbles of ancient air – like tiny time capsules - able to tell scientists a story about what the world used to be like and how humans have changed it.
Summer is for scientific fieldwork. Three NIWA scientists are heading into the wild blue yonder, some with fancy technology and others with a coffee cup and a bag of party balloons.
NIWA atmospheric scientists in Central Otago are turning plane spotters next week as they eagerly await the flyover of a NASA research plane.
The laser lady of Lauder

By day Penny Smale is a mum to two young boys, living on a rural property in the middle of a farming district in Central Otago.
By night, she leaves home, walks the short distance to what is essentially a large outbuilding in a paddock, and fires lasers into the sky. Penny operates a Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) instrument at the Lauder research station in Central Otago.  Essentially, she fires lasers into the sky and uses a telescope to measure what comes back.

The current method for calculating wind speed-up is inadequate, and can grossly under-predict correct design wind speeds in NZ's complex terrain.

This research project focusses on modelling atmospheric chemistry and climate from the surface to the top of the stratosphere, using sophisticated chemistry-climate models.

The National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research (NIWA) has reported to the Whakatane District Council (WDC) on the results of tests into accuracy of the district council’s sunshine recording equipment.

The atmosphere is comprised of layers based on temperature. These layers are the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and thermosphere.
Climate data and common terms explaining the causes and effects of climate change.
 

All staff working on this subject

Principal Scientist - Atmosphere
Emeritus Researcher – Atmospheric Radiation
Principal Scientist - Atmosphere and Climate
Atmospheric Scientist
placeholder image
Air Quality Technician
Atmospheric Scientist
Subscribe to RSS - Atmosphere