Water & Atmosphere

NIWA’s flagship publication, published three times a year, showcases our latest research, and examines resource management issues across all sectors. It keeps you informed with news briefs, intrigued with stories about our amazing biodiversity, and fascinated with spectacular photo spreads.

You can download Water and Atmosphere as a pdf from the links below, or subscribe to a free hard copy by e-mailing wa-editor@niwa.co.nz. You can also sign up to receive notifications whenever a new version is available (online or in hard copy).

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Issues

The February 2017 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
The October 2016 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
The June 2016 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
The November 2015 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
The September 2015 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
The June 2015 edition of NIWA's flagship publication, Water & Atmosphere.
NIWA's flagship publication returns after a year away, with features on water quality, farmed hapuka, the Hector's dolphin, great white sharks and bio-fuel from wastewater.

As a project to celebrate the creativity of the Principal Scientists at NIWA in Hamilton, David Roper and Stephanie Parkyn have created a series of photographs that depict the inspirations behind the scientists’ work. ‘Waterworks’, on the front cover, refers to Dr Chris Tanner’s pioneering use of constructed wetlands to treat wastewaters. See the images created for the other scientists at Inspired minds: curiosity and imagination in science.

RV Tangaroa in newly formed ice in the northern Ross Sea. Scientists from NIWA and other institutions travelled for seven weeks and covered more than 7000 nautical miles to sample Antarctic marine life. The back cover shows the ship’s track and sampling stations. Read about the voyage and see some of the finds in 'Back from the ice bearing scientific treasure'.

Berthing at Aotea Wharf in Wellington, NIWA's research vessel Tangaroa is readied for another voyage as part of the Census of Marine Life. CoML is an international initiative involving more than 80 nations in a 10-year effort to assess and explain the diversity, distribution, and abundance of life in the oceans. Read more about New Zealand's participation in 'No ordinary stock-take: Census of Marine Life'.

A moon jelly drifts past a line of cultured mussels while NIWA scientists set up experiments nearby. They are exploring the benefits of integrated co-culture, where the waste from one species is food for one or more other cultured species. Read more in 'Finding hidden treasue in aquaculture waste'.

Flooding in March 2007 forced Northland farmers to move stock to higher ground; the same region was hit again in July. This special issue looks at ways that hazard forecasting can lessen the blow for communities caught in the path when nature turns nasty.

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