Feature story

New Zealand’s coast is sculpted by ocean waves. Some wave conditions bring joy to surfers and beachgoers, but, at other times, waves can cause major hazards at sea or along the shore.

Barb Hayden is never far from the sea. In fact, it’s been a constant in her life—a personal and professional passion.
The Kiwi dream of owning a beachfront property with panoramic views of the ocean is under threat—and not just for financial reasons.
A NIWA technician spends four days and three nights on a crowded boat heading to one of the most remote places in the Pacific to help install a weather station. Conditions are so arduous he decides to quit his job - but how do you do that in the middle of the ocean?
New research tests the air to estimate the carbon sink potential of forests and landscapes. It reveals that the ability of New Zealand’s land biosphere to absorb carbon could be 50 per cent more than currently estimated.
At a rough count, 700 million litres of rain runs off the nation’s roads every year. That’s enough water to fill almost 300 Olympic-sized pools.
Iwi has joined forces with councils and NIWA to restore an estuarine ecosystem to its former health.
NIWA is working alongside Māori to develop gateways to science and technology partnerships that are helping grow the Māori economy.
When you’ve spent a long time viewing something a particular way, it’s hard to recognise when it changes.
Marino Tahi is a man who speaks volumes between sentences.
The Quota Management System, which some say saved New Zealand fisheries, is 30 years old today. The system is founded on science that studies fish biology, abundance and distribution, and estimates how many can be caught and still keep the population healthy.
While Tangaroa might be considered its flagship, NIWA’s extensive range of maritime work could not be completed without the support vessels Kaharoa and Ikatere.
Approved by the United Nations Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, New Zealand was made sovereign over 1.7 million square kilometres of seafloor
Category 5 Cyclone Winston made landfall in Fiji on 20 February, damaging and destroying thousands of homes and buildings. It left in its wake a death toll of 44 and more than 50,000 people in evacuation centres.
NIWA’s flagship of New Zealand ocean research – Tangaroa – is the modern-day Endeavour, venturing into open oceans to conduct work that’s proving how science and commercial outcomes go hand-in-hand.
The discovery of diaries of an English missionary living in Northland in the 1800s reveals him as New Zealand’s first meteorologist.
NIWA-developed software is becoming the international standard in the assessment and management of fish stocks.
NIWA scientists are tapping into nature’s archives to understand our abrupt climate changes.
The coldest seawater on earth could help scientists understand why Antarctic sea ice is growing in a warming world
NIWA’s climate scientists are working to improve seasonal climate forecasts.
New Zealand’s answer to ocean acidification is a model of the ‘best team’ approach – when organisations pool talent and resources to find solutions to national, or global, issues.]
The seafood counter at your local supermarket has changed, because you have.
The world’s oceans are acidifying as a result of the carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by humanity.
Carrying out scientific experiments in the coldest part of the world is tough — even tougher if you’re miles away from Scott Base in a shipping container. But one NIWA scientist insists it’s a lot of fun.
Floods are not unusual in New Zealand, but those that hit us early this winter broke records. Why did they occur? Should we expect more? Can we predict future floods?

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