Feature story

Local hapū and NIWA are working together to find out more about juvenile freshwater eels or tuna in streams connecting to the Wairua River in the Wairoa catchment in Northland.
There’s another way of measuring the health of rivers – the health of invertebrate populations that need them, says John Quinn, NIWA Chief Scientist, Freshwater and Estuaries.
Erica Williams' story starts with the website of Moerewa School, where pupil Tyra-Lee explains her connection to a very special place in her small Far North town.
The government has released the ‘Clean Water’ package of proposed reforms, aimed at making more of our rivers swimmable. But how is ‘swimmable’ to be measured, and do these measures stack up?
Imagine if you could foresee what would happen to your home in a severe flood or tsunami, and then work out how to prevent or reduce the impact before any such event occurred.
Returning water to our waterways after we’ve used it in our homes, on farms and in industry is a complex and challenging process.
NIWA's Freshwater and Estuaries Chief Scientist Dr John Quinn believes the dairy industry has been responsive in the tools it has adopted to reduce its impact on waterways.
NIWA discusses, in depth, this year's most asked question—what is happening to our fresh waterways?

As New Zealand's "Mr Eel", Niwa's Dr Don Jellyman has heard every tall tale. And some of them may be true.

We examine how the Sustainable Seas National Science Challenge plans to enhance the use of marine resources within biological constraints.

New Zealand’s mangrove swamps and coastal marshes may be particularly adept at absorbing and storing the carbon we emit.

New Zealand’s coast is sculpted by ocean waves. Some wave conditions bring joy to surfers and beachgoers, but, at other times, waves can cause major hazards at sea or along the shore.

Barb Hayden is never far from the sea. In fact, it’s been a constant in her life—a personal and professional passion.
The Kiwi dream of owning a beachfront property with panoramic views of the ocean is under threat—and not just for financial reasons.
A NIWA technician spends four days and three nights on a crowded boat heading to one of the most remote places in the Pacific to help install a weather station. Conditions are so arduous he decides to quit his job - but how do you do that in the middle of the ocean?
New research tests the air to estimate the carbon sink potential of forests and landscapes. It reveals that the ability of New Zealand’s land biosphere to absorb carbon could be 50 per cent more than currently estimated.
Iwi has joined forces with councils and NIWA to restore an estuarine ecosystem to its former health.
NIWA is working alongside Māori to develop gateways to science and technology partnerships that are helping grow the Māori economy.
When you’ve spent a long time viewing something a particular way, it’s hard to recognise when it changes.
Marino Tahi is a man who speaks volumes between sentences.
The Quota Management System, which some say saved New Zealand fisheries, is 30 years old today. The system is founded on science that studies fish biology, abundance and distribution, and estimates how many can be caught and still keep the population healthy.
While Tangaroa might be considered its flagship, NIWA’s extensive range of maritime work could not be completed without the support vessels Kaharoa and Ikatere.
In 2008, New Zealand experienced a massive growth spurt – gaining an area of control the size of Libya.
Category 5 Cyclone Winston made landfall in Fiji on 20 February, damaging and destroying thousands of homes and buildings. It left in its wake a death toll of 44 and more than 50,000 people in evacuation centres.
NIWA’s flagship of New Zealand ocean research – Tangaroa – is the modern-day Endeavour, venturing into open oceans to conduct work that’s proving how science and commercial outcomes go hand-in-hand.

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