Coasts and Oceans news

News and media releases related to the our coasts and oceans-related work.

Subscribe to this news via RSS

A joint Japanese-New Zealand scientific research voyage leaves Tonga this week to explore underwater mountains and volcanoes about 1000km northeast of New Zealand.

More than a dozen NIWA scientists are heading to Antarctica in the next couple of months as the crucial weather window opens for the summer season of research above, on and under the ice.

NIWA scientists are pioneering a new way of tapping into international expertise through an online specimen identification service of particular benefit to New Zealand's biosecurity.

NIWA is diverting its flagship research vessel Tangaroa to undertake survey work in the Cook Strait following the earthquakes in Marlborough and Wellington in recent days.

One of the biggest drivers of New Zealand's climate is the influence of ocean currents and climate systems in Antarctica and the Southern Ocean. Even relatively subtle changes could have dramatic impacts on our climate and ability to work and live as we do.

Information gathered by whalers in the 19th century to support the systematic killing of southern right whales in Australasian offshore waters has been used by NIWA scientists to better understand – and ultimately help protect – the present-day habitats of this endangered species.

Scientists from NIWA and the Department of Conservation (DOC) have used a remote operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with cameras and a grappling arm to locate and sample specimens of sea pen previously unknown to science, hidden in the undiveable depths of remote Fiordland.

NIWA is sampling subtidal seagrass meadows, and other habitats, in the southern Kaipara Harbour, from February to March this year.  This week, the scientists have been looking at the ‘hottest spots’ for juvenile snapper.

When you are at the beach or harbours this summer, don't be surprised if you see sea squirts - marine animals we commonly see attached to rocks and wharf piles that have two siphons on the top of their bodies, one to draw in water and the other to expel it. When disturbed, sea squirts contract their siphons, expelling streams of water—hence their name.

Scientists have returned from a two-week survey to the north of New Zealand, near the Kermadec Islands, with photos and footage of new-to-science fish.

A team of 22 Australian, New Zealand and French scientists will depart Wellington next week, onboard NIWA's RV Tangaroa, for a 42-day voyage to the Mertz Polynya region of Antarctica.

There you are at the beach this summer. The water is cool and inviting. You go in for a dip. Then something small nips you.

Scientists set sail on NIWA's research vessel Kaharoa this week to film and explore many aspects of life in deep-sea habitats, and capture fish that are new to science, in the Kermadec Trench, northeast of New Zealand.

Whether you're at the beach, in the bach, on the boat or by the barbecue, summer holiday fun hinges on knowing when conditions outside will be favourable and not-so-favourable for the activities you have in mind.

Deep NZ: Our underwater wilderness – a new exhibition of stunning deep-sea animal specimens and imagery – opens at Te Papa today.

NIWA's new Undersea New Zealand map provides a unique insight into the shape of the seafloor in one of the world's most extensive marine jurisdictions.

This week, New Zealand's leading coastal scientists, engineers and planners are attending the New Zealand Coastal Society 20th Annual Conference in Auckland. NIWA has many speakers presenting work at the conference.

This week, New Zealand's leading coastal scientists, engineers and planners are attending the New Zealand Coastal Society 20th Annual Conference in Auckland. At the conference, NIWA's Dr Philip Barnes will explore the question of how well do we know New Zealand's submarine earthquake hazards.

It may be nori, but not as we knew it. Scientists have changed the taxonomy of one of the most well-known red seaweeds in the world – known as nori in Japanese and karengo in Maori.

An international team of scientists has been studying bacteria that live in Arctic and Antarctica waters.

Pages

Subscribe to NIWA Science Centre News