Coasts and Oceans news

News and media releases related to the our coasts and oceans-related work.

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New Zealand scientists are part of an international team that has documented duelling ocean and atmospheric heat transport during periods of abrupt climate change.
Sponges are amongst the most common marine invertebrates that inhabit the New Zealand coastline, from the intertidal zone down to the continental shelf, to abyssal plains and deep ocean trenches.
NIWA has transformed 1.5 million square kilometres of data into the most accurate and detailed map yet of the land underneath the sea around New Zealand.
Where in New Zealand might you find a witchy finger sponge or a pie-crust crab? The answer will be found in New Zealand’s first series of electronic identification guides for marine invertebrates.
The increasing threat of marine pests to New Zealand’s biosecurity is the focus of a major new research project to be conducted by NIWA scientists.
NIWA scientists are to undertake a major research project to determine how New Zealand’s marine ecosystems are faring under climate change.
By 2050 New Zealand will have a fleet of ocean gliders undertaking scientific measurements, an aquaculture industry powered by marine energy operating far offshore and weather forecasts available 18 months in advance.
A successful electronic tagging project means scientists have made some important discoveries about spinetail devilrays.
A tiny community of New Zealand sea lions on the Otago Peninsula is helping scientists solve the mystery of why some populations are doing better than others.
Another colossal squid is under examination in Wellington, but this one could fit in the palm of your hand.
NIWA scientists use the latest multibeam echo-sounding technology to generate new charts of the seafloor around Kapiti island.
A team of marine geoscientists from New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research begins mapping the submarine landscape of Kapiti Island and Coast on Friday, 5 June.
Exploring the frontier of New Zealand oceanographic research is the launch mission for Manaia, NIWA’s newly named underwater glider.
The work of NIWA biologists has discovered 141 new marine creatures in the past three years, an important contribution to a worldwide register of the planet’s underwater life.
Hundreds of amazing images have come back from NIWA’s NZ-AU Antarctic Ecosystems Voyage 2015 on RV Tangaroa.
NIWA scientists have anchored an echosounder to the sea floor of Terra Nova Bay that could reveal the mystery of silverfish reproduction under the Antarctic ice.
NIWA deepwater research vessel Tangaroa docks in Wellington today to complete a successful six-week New Zealand-Australia Antarctic Ecosystems voyage.
Our journey is slowly coming to an end. The past five weeks has passed so quickly and I have loved every moment of it.
At the base of the ocean’s food chain are algae. Algae feed the krill that feed the whales.
Today marked the last official day of science here in the Ross Sea. The ship has now been turned north and the 8 day steam back to Wellington has begun.

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