Climate change

Climate change effects are accelerating, driving the need for actions informed by sound climate knowledge.

Climate change

NIWA is committed to providing the science needed to adapt to and mitigate climate change. By making informed choices now, we can reduce risks, maximise opportunities, foster climate resilience and work towards a carbon neutral economy.

“When it comes to climate change we are in the beautiful position of knowing what our choices are. We can feel a real sense of opportunity about the future - what role our science can play, and how people can contribute”

Dr Sam Dean, Chief Scientist, Climate, Atmosphere and Hazards

Knowledge is power

Our scientists provide the knowledge key for evidence-based decision-making and for our society as a whole.

Well-informed, better prepared

Our scientists provide the knowledge key for evidence-based decision-making and for our society as a whole.

Assess the risks, plan proactively

NIWA science is driving progress on climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies

Science is a foundation for effective action on climate change

NIWA science is driving progress on climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies.

Our solutions-focused science

 

 

Making a difference

Here is a snapshot of some scientists working on climate change at NIWA.

 

 
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“You can say what you want about temperature on the ground but you can’t make a glacier lie” - Dr Andrew Lorrie

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"It’s imperative that scientists like myself are not just monitoring impacts, but also seeking solutions to climate change and ocean acidification" - Dr Cliff Law

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“Time spent in drought may double or triple this century for parts of New Zealand - NIWA is committed to helping our agriculture and other drought-sensitive sectors adapt to these projected changes” - Dr Andrew Tait

[Photographs: Dave Allen]

The signs of global warming are everywhere

“Climate change is not just about changing temperatures”

Dr Rob Murdoch, General Manager - Research

The latest climate change facts you need to know:

 

Climate change resources

Climate change resources

  • What is climate change and why is it happening? 
  • What does El Niño and La Niña mean exactly? 
  • What is the greenhouse effect? 
  • What does climate change mean for New Zealand? 
  • What is a climate model? What is ocean acidification?

Find out more about climate change

Videos

Our videography and photography team is passionate about promoting our science, engaging people directly with compelling stories and imagery.

Watch more climate change videos

Latest news

Spare a thought for Fieldays exhibitors putting the final touches to their stands tomorrow – it’s going to be wet.
NIWA is encouraging farmers to plan for climate change so they can maximise their abilities to adapt and thrive as significant change begins to take place.
Massive increases in computing power are allowing NIWA scientists to not only analyse more data, faster, but also to envisage completely new experiments.
New Zealand’s glaciers have all retreated and lost volume since NIWA started surveying them in 1977.
Our Climate is Changing

Our climate is changing - we need to act now.

Glaciers Don't Lie

If you think New Zealand's Southern Alps are shielded from climate change – take a look at this. "You can't make a glacier lie.”

Spare a thought for Fieldays exhibitors putting the final touches to their stands tomorrow – it’s going to be wet.
NIWA is encouraging farmers to plan for climate change so they can maximise their abilities to adapt and thrive as significant change begins to take place.
NIWA science is driving progress on climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies.
Our videography and photography team is passionate about promoting our science, engaging people directly with compelling stories and imagery.
Our scientists provide the knowledge key for evidence-based decision-making and for our society as a whole.
Massive increases in computing power are allowing NIWA scientists to not only analyse more data, faster, but also to envisage completely new experiments.
New Zealand’s glaciers have all retreated and lost volume since NIWA started surveying them in 1977.
NIWA has joined forces with Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology to issue a joint Special Climate Statement about unusual weather patterns over summer.
Climate scientists and glaciologists are taking to the skies this week to find out how New Zealand’s glaciers are faring following this summer’s record-breaking warmth.
Ancient swamp kauri is being used by NIWA scientists to reveal the secrets of past climates.
Despite a sub-tropical storm and two ex-tropical cyclones, this summer is about to become the hottest in history.

John McGregor from NIWA checks on the instruments that measure atmospheric gases throughout our voyage.

Auckland region climate change projections and impacts | Auckland Council

Auckland Council and Council Controlled Organisations commissioned NIWA to provide climate change projections, including high-resolution maps for the Auckland Region.

A two-week expedition to tag blue whales in New Zealand waters for the first time, almost came up empty due to warmer sea temperatures causing the animals to change their behaviour.

Hazard risk is compounding in low-lying coastal areas of New Zealand, because hazard events are occurring more often (on the back of a rising sea), while at the same time coastal development and property/infrastructure values are increasing.

Rapid warming of the ocean near Tasmania may provide a good indication of how the water around New Zealand will change as the planet warms, say NIWA scientists.

New Zealand winters are a month shorter than they were 80 years ago, NIWA scientists say.

“This is a consequence of rising temperatures around the globe, and such trends in colder temperatures and frosts will influence the life cycle of plants and animals” - Dr Brett Mullan.

A dramatic change in sea ice this year is likely to hamper a NIWA-led research project aiming to better understand how ice shelves will melt as the ocean warms.
A decade of scientific research into how ocean acidification is affecting New Zealand waters has led to far greater understanding of the vulnerability of our marine ecosystems, according to a newly published review.
The Deep South National Science Challenge is one of New Zealand’s most audacious collaborative projects in recent times.
Pioneering NIWA scientists are returning to the cold continent in October, this time to focus on the seabed.

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